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timthelder

Explore Scientific 80mm F/6 triplet

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I got one of those Black Friday type sales emails from Astronomics and OPT on Explore Scientific gear and wound up with an unplanned purchase of the above scope for only $472.49. Regular price $729.99. Too good to pass up.

On some of Explore Scientific's scopes and accessories there is an instant rebate PLUS an additional 25% off. Now that's a sale!

Just a heads up....

And, after it quits raining/snowing/hailing/monsooning, etc. I will give my humble opinion of my above purchase. Right now it's looing like sometime next year!

Cheers, Tim.

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Got'er mounted up. thought I would share a few pic's and observations.

I chose to go with back-to-back optical tube rings for mounting to the side of the 100ED, (still awaiting a star test on that one.) The focuser appears to be of high quality, very smooth and extremely tight tolerances. Two screws for locking down the focus, rotatable for object framing and quite a bit of focuser travel. The dew shield is nice but a bit bulky IMO. It is moderately heavy at 7.5lbs, almost doubles the weight of this particular set-up. This scopes optics are collimatable I hope they are still spot-on after the shipping process.

The ad for the scope says " Removing the dew shield will give you access to the lens centering screws in the sides of the lens cell, which you can then adjust yourself by referring to the supplied instructions." I did not get any supplied destructions with mine.

Now awaiting first light!

I did attach the camera and check to make sure I can adjust my guide-scope properly and be able to orient the camera for framing etc. It is very tight, but I believe everything will do just fine.

Any potential problems one may think I may encounter...now's the time.

IMG_2172web_zps17ff6b94.jpg

IMG_2174web_zpsf26e5500.jpg

IMG_2176web_zpsf0fcc15c.jpg

Cheers, Tim.

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Any potential problems one may think I may encounter...now's the time.

This is a triple telescope setup Tim? Can you show us a shot of it on the mount? What angle are you going to balance first?

The only problem I can see is that Greg is no longer the only triple scope man. Is cyberspace big enough for two triple scope owners?

Ray

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No, this is an either/or telescope set-up as I will only use the 80mm, or the 100mm. The top scope is the guide-scope. So Greg is still the only three-fer one imager.

Haven't tried tackling balance yet, but I will. The center of gravity is in between the two scopes, shouldn't be to bad.

Tim.

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Cripes! This gives new meaning to the phrase "pack 'em, rack 'em & stack 'em" - although maybe we can leave off the bit about racking 'cos they seem to be Crayford-style focusers...although I suppose you still rack any focuser out! :smiley-laughing001::rolleyes:

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Dang, it's not all that...Just a simple use this'un or that'un set-up. Guidescope on top, 100mmED on bottom, with the cute little scope hopefully close enough to the COG as to not give me some balance issues.

Now on the 9.25' SCT I do have a JMI electronic focuser. Since I can't reach the focuser while sitting, it makes life much easier. Until...

LOL, Tim.

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Now 5 imagers on the megawasp array of course :)

Tim - if it comes to collimating the scope - this is how you do it.

Buy an artificial star (bright LED with a metal aperture with 5 or so laser drilled holes which are the stars).

Download the free software Metaguide and get a web cam on the end of you scope talking to Metaguide.

Now image the smallest artificial star on the web cam. On either side of focus you will see diffraction rings - centre them in the star.

With the diffraction rings centred (by adjusting the scope collimation screws) now focus the star on the web cam.

Metaguide gives you an intensity pattern for the star and a (wandering) dot will show you where the peak in intensity is.

Obviously you want the peak in intensity dead centre of the star. If it isn't then TINY adjustments of the scope collimation screws until it is.

Job done.

The really great thing about this method is you can do it in broad daylight and you don't need to waste good imaging time.

Good luck.

Greg

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