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Paramount

IC443 - Jellyfish Nebula in HST palette

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Hi

I just finished this a few nights ago, this has taken several nights to do due to weather and false starts, it is 24x10 minutes Ha, 26x10 minutes OIII and 22x10 minutes SII. The seeing conditions were very poor for the SII data with some very thin misty cloud throughout the evening. This was taken with the Televue NP127is/FLI imaging system that I'm testing, this is set up on my Paramount ME with auto guiding taken care of by an Officine Stellare Falco guidescope and Starlight Xpress Lodestar camera. Image acquisition, guiding and stacking was done in Maxim DL5, the images were registered with Registar and processing was done with Photoshop CC.

The full size image can be seen at the following link

http://i.pbase.com/o9/29/869929/1/154765888.euHYVpzp.JellyfishHSTfinal.jpg

Thanks for looking

Best wishes

Gordon

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Jaw dropping Gordon. Colours are fantastic. Did you use any techniques to bring out the jellyfish more than the back ground? Because it seems to pop out at me on my screen, in a good way of course, but it is very vivid.

Ray

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Jaw dropping Gordon. Colours are fantastic. Did you use any techniques to bring out the jellyfish more than the back ground? Because it seems to pop out at me on my screen, in a good way of course, but it is very vivid.

Ray

Hi Ray

Thanks for the comments, no special techniques, here is a brief overview of my workflow

1. Calibrate all raw frames

2. Register frames with Registar

3. Stack in Maxim DL5

4. Do a stretch with a gamma value of 0.1, maximum pixel value and 16 bit before saving to 16 bit tiff file

5. Open all three master frames in Photoshop CC and equalise the histograms using the mid point on levels

6. Colour combine to HST palette

7. Curves and levels to get the details out

8. Gradient Xterminator

9. Selective colour to balance the colours out to give a more aesthetic appearance

10. High pass filter to make the details stand out more

11. Crop the image to remove any stacking artefacts

That's about it really, nothing fancy

Best wishes

Gordon

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Interesting work flow. Gradient Xterminator? Does this mean you don't take flats?

Ray

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Interesting work flow. Gradient Xterminator? Does this mean you don't take flats?

Ray

Yes I take flats but, as I boost the weaker channels before colour combining ie the OIII and SII then everything including signal, noise, gradient, etc is boosted so with images that require the extra boost for the weaker signals there is sometimes a gradient that needs taking care of. This is especially more so when shooting OIII when there is moon light. Flats won't remove a gradient in these cases

Best wishes

Gordon

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Thanks for the tip mate. I'll keep this in mind. I've been doing some work lately with narrowband but wasn't happy with the noise.

Ray

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