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phoenix

Astronomy Quiz

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HI All,

Saturn used to have wind speeds of 1700km/h at the equator. But they have recently been reported as slowing down. So I'll say Saturn.

(I think Jupiter has winds of only 400mph)

Cheers Colin

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Your right Colin its saturn :welldone:

Saturn is the second largest planet in our solar system, after its neighbor, Jupiter. It has the least amount of density of all the planets (about 30% less dense than water). This leads people to believe that if a body of water larger than the planet was found, Saturn would float in it. Considering the vastness of space, a body of water that size could possibly exist somewhere in one of the many galaxies we know of. Saturn's day is less than half as long as an Earth day, lasting only 10 hours and 39 minutes. Saturn's orbit around the sun takes 29 1/2 Earth years.

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Which of Mars' moons orbits the red planet three times in a single day (or once every seven hours)? .............................:hmm:

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Phobos.

It is said that Mars moon's are actually captured asteroids, being that they are very small. Deimos is said to be between only 6 to 8 km in Radius (not being round), compare that to Our Moon which is 1,738 km in Radius.

There are about 26 asteroids over 100km in radius, so these moons of Mars are quite small even by asteroid standards.

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You are correct Robert.:welldone: :welldone:

Phobos is a very irregularly shaped moon, as is Mars' second moon, Deimos. Phobos is only 3,000 miles above the surface of Mars. It also takes only seven hours to orbit the planet. Compare that to Earth's moon, which is 238,000 miles away from Earth and orbits the planet approximately once every 28 days.

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Hey Draig

The answer was Stella Polaris. :thumbsupmate:

Stella Polaris, meaning The Pole Star, has been given many names other than the North Star. It is also known as The Lodestar, The Navigator's Star (or Navigatoria), Phoenice, Angel Stern and many, many more. The North Star is 680 light-years away from the North Pole of the Earth. It is said that the light from Polaris takes approximately 680 years to travel to Earth. This means when a person looks up at Polaris, the twinkling light of the star is actually 680 years old. Polaris is located in the constellation Ursa Minor.

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I guess False.

85% seems far too high a level.

There would have to be a larger amounts of Hydrogen than just 15%.

Methane gives the planet it's blue colour, but I believe it's a rather small percentage of it's atmosphere.

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Hi Jason,

The answer is false.

Whilst I don't know the exact percantage's only one third of Neptune is made up of Hydrogen, Hellium and Methane.

Cheers Colin

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Robert & Colin well done top of the class.:welldone:

The answer is False

The atmospheric composition of Neptune is as follows: 85% hydrogen, 13% helium, and 2% methane. Neptune is one of the gas giants, along with Jupiter, Saturn, and Uranus. These are also the only four planets that each has rings. Though most people associate Saturn as the ringed-planet, it is true that the other three gas giants have rings as well, though they are much fainter than those of Saturn.

Cheers Jason :pipethinker:

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What is one advantage of a very large Dobsonian telescope?

1 Ease of transporting

2 More light gathering power

3 Lighter weight

4 There is no advantage

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2. More light gathering power

If I understood the question correctly, as compared to a 'smaller Dobsonian telescope', which by it's very nature of being smaller would be lighter and easier to transport.

"Dobsonian telescope" is refering to the telescopes mount, and if you are comparing the 'mounts' to a similiar size telescope with a different mount than the answer of 1 & 3 would be applicable.

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The answer is Longitudal

There is no such thing as a longitudal telescope mount, at least, I don't think there is!.........................:hmm:

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