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inline_phil

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    5
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10 Good

About inline_phil

  • Rank
    Mercury Member

core_pfieldgroups_99

  • Location
    Brooksville, FL
  • Interests
    astronomy, inline skating, outdoor activities
  • Occupation
    Author
  • Astronomy Equipment
    Looking for a Cheshire eyepiece for my new to me (used) refractor

Contact Methods

  • Website URL
    http://www.philiprastocny.com
  1. Wanted: Cheshire

    I once volunteered a week at the Meyer Womble Observatory, then the higest telescope in the world (14,148 feet). This cured me of the fever for a few weeks. See http://www.mountevans.com/ and http://mysite.du.edu/~rstencel/MtEvans/. At the time I had an idea to use their binocular scope to do some sum-and-difference observing. One of the tubes photographs visual band and the other photographs the near IR band. My idea was to use the two signals thinking this: dark matter blocks the visual spectrum and IR passes through unaffected (that's why FLIR cameras work and action films see heat signatures on the other side of a brick wall). Subtracting the two signals should reveal what the eye cannot see thereby revealing what is obsrtucting the light. Well, unfortunately, the camera was inoperative and I never had another opportunity to go back (invitation is still open). Since then, the camera was donated to the University of Wyoming and the paper I wanted to write was dismissed by the U of TN. I guess as an amateure I just did not have enough letters in the suffix of my name to be considered seriously. Anyway, now that astrophotography is affordable to amateurs, my thought returns for the hunt for dark matter using this same approch of two exposures. I know of many fine visual-band cameras so the Q is: is there an IR camera available for such a search? This is simple science all amateures could do and contribute to moving forward our understanding of the cosmos. Just think of this: use this trick to actually image a distant planet as it passes between us and its sun. Or find a nearby dust cloud not by looking for dark patches but by seeing it glare at you once the background stars are replaced? The applications could be astoundingly revealing. So who do I talk to about advancing this idea? Anyone?
  2. The 10 inch After moving from Denver to Central Florida, I found our new home to be a wishful-sinful location: warm all year but sea-level thick atmosphere. Still, I love looking up and gazing at the sky. It's nice to stare through an eyepiece in shorts in February! Cheers, Philip Rastocny, Author Click on these links to see my work
  3. Wanted: Cheshire

    Have you found the kit link for the drive?
  4. Wanted: Cheshire

    Hi Ray, Just picked up a Meade 102 ACHR/500 with the stock tripod. I'm going to use it for those spontaneous evenings since it is so easy to setup. I also need a clock drive since the mount is manual. Any ideas? I have a 10" Meade LXD75 I use for deep sky stuff I've tweaked up. Assorted Celestron, Meade, and TeleVue lenses. Looks like you're set with your gear or do you still have aperture fever? There's always one more...
  5. Wanted: Cheshire

    Looking for one collecting dust that can be put to good use on my refractor. Let me know what you have. Cheers, Philip Rastocny, Author Click on this link to see my work
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